BEND BULLETIN - On local screens the week of Aug. 10-16

Thu, 08/10/2017 - 00:02
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BEND BULLETIN - On local screens the week of Aug. 10-16
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THE BULLETIN - On local screens the week of Aug. 10-16

Synopses and short reviews of films showing now (or soon) on Central Oregon screens

HEADS UP

“Batman and Harley Quinn” — In this new DC Universe animated movie Poison Ivy and Jason Woodrue (a.k.a. The Floronic Man) embark on an ecological quest to save the planet and eliminate most of humankind. To save humanity, Batman and Nightwing are forced to enlist Harley Quinn. This film screens at 7:30 p.m. Monday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 (plus fees). 80 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Bonnie and Clyde” 50th Anniversary — The 1967 film depicts the real-life crime spree and love story of bank robbers Bonnie Parker (Faye Dunaway) and Clyde Barrow (Warren Beatty) in depression-era America. This film screens at 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 (plus fees). 120 minutes. (R)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Drum Corps International: Big, Loud & Live 14” — 15 of DCI’s top performing corps battle in the championship preliminaries for the chance to be named the 2017 DCI world champion. This film screens at 3:30 p.m. Thursday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $18 (plus fees). 315 minutes. (G)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

EurOpera HD: “Rigoletto — Liceu Barcelona” — From Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu comes Verdi’s tragic opera about court jester, Rigoletto, who seeks revenge against the Duke of Mantua after the Duke abducts and seduces Rigoletto’s daughter. This film screens at noon Saturday and 7 p.m. Tuesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $15 (plus fees). 168 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from Regal Cinemas

“The Glass Castle: A Conversation with Jeannette Walls” — An early screening of “The Glass Castle” (starring Brie Larson, Woody Harrelson and Naomi Watts) followed by commentary from author Jeannette Walls, whose memoir about coming of age in a dysfunctional family was adapted into the film’s screenplay. This film screens at 8:30 p.m. Thursday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12 for adults and $9.50 for seniors and children (plus fees). 162 minutes. (PG-13)

— Synopsis from Regal Cinemas

BendFilm’s In Case You Missed It: “Hunky Dory” — In a film of quiet desperation and humor, a dive bar drag queen named Sidney (Tomas Pais) is suddenly forced to care for his 11-year-old son. Pais, who also co-wrote the screenplay, will participate in a post-screening discussion. This film screens at 6 p.m. Monday at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $11. Running time unavailable. (No MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from McMenamins

Late Night Retro Summer Series: “The Princess Bride” — In this 1987 romantic comedy a young boy’s grandfather reads him a story called “The Princess Bride” while he is home sick in bed, about a proud princess, the farm boy who loves her and their adventures. This film screens at 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday (over 21 only) and Sunday at 11 a.m. (all ages)at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. Cost is $4. 98 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“The LEGO Batman Movie” — A cooler-than-ever Bruce Wayne must deal with the usual suspects as they plan to rule Gotham City, while discovering that he has accidentally adopted a teenage orphan who wishes to become his sidekick. Discounted summer screenings at 10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $1. 104 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

Movies on the Lawn: “Beauty and the Beast” — The live-action adaptation of the classic fairy tale about a monstrous looking prince (Dan Stevens) and a young woman (Emma Watson) who fall in love. Bring a picnic blanket or low-profile chair. This film screens shortly after sunset (around 9 p.m.) on Friday at Pronghorn Resort in Bend. Free, RSVP requested at bit.ly/2vG3QTT. 129 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

“Mune: Guardian of the Moon” — In this animated film the title Guardian of the Moon is bestowed on the waif-like Mune, a small and frightened forest faun. This news excites Necross, the nefarious ruler of the Underworld, a corrupted ex-guardian who decides to steal back the sun for himself. This film screens at 12:55 p.m. Saturday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $12.50 for adults and $10 for children (plus fees). 95 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from Fathom Events

“Storks” — Storks have moved on from delivering babies to packages. But when an order for a baby appears, the best delivery stork must scramble to fix the error by delivering the baby. Discounted summer screenings at 10 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 & IMAX in Bend. Cost is $1. 87 minutes. (PG)

— Synopsis from IMDb.com

WHAT’S NEW

“Annabelle: Creation” () Director David F. Sandberg takes the cliche-filled pantry of the Devil-doll prequel “Annabelle: Creation” and turns out a dish that is uncommonly, nerve-wrackingly satisfying. Sandberg knows how to ratchet up suspense, composing shots filled with beautiful shadows, in whose corners there always seems to be lurking something scary. 109 minutes. (R)

— Michael O’Sullivan, The Washington Post

“Glass Castle” () Writer-director Destin Daniel Cretton has adapted Jeanette Walls’ blockbuster 2005 memoir, “The Glass Castle,” which chronicled her unconventional and destitute childhood. Due to the Herculean task of adaptation, the movie lacks the unflinching detail of Wall’s memoir but its message is universal. There is no greater self-acceptance than fully accepting who you are, where you come from, and what made you. 127 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“The Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature” () A largely unengaging modern-day animal fable that picks up some time after the first film left off, with Surly the purple squirrel (voice of Will Arnett) and his friends finding their food source is threatened when the town’s mayor (Bobby Moynihan) decides to replace the nature preserve with a moneymaking amusement park. 86 minutes. (PG)

— Pat Padua, The Washington Post

STILL SHOWING

“Atomic Blonde” () Charlize Theron stars as the titular blonde in this violently stylish spy flick. It is a cool bit of eye candy with incredible stunts and a killer soundtrack, even though it falters on the story itself and the second hour drags into dullness. It’s a shame, because “Atomic Blonde” is a visual cinematic delight that’s all dressed up with just nowhere to go. 115 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Baby Driver” () Edgar Wright’s “Baby Driver,” about a savant of a getaway driver (Ansel Elgort) working for a criminal mastermind (Kevin Spacey), crackles with originality and dark humor. If you see this movie and tell me you didn’t have a great time, we’re going to have to talk about your idea of a great time. 113 minutes (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“The Big Sick” () In a fictionalized version of real events in his life, Kumail Nanjiani plays a comedian whose new girlfriend (Zoe Kazan) goes into a medically induced coma. Funny and smart and wise and silly, it is without a doubt one of the best romantic comedies I have seen in a long time. 119 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Cars 3” () Just when you thought this Disney-Pixar franchise was out of gas, along comes a lovely, clever and entertaining generational tale with tons of heart, a simple and effective storyline, wonderful candy-colored visuals and winning voice work from the talented cast of returning regulars and welcome newcomers. 100 minutes. (G)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“The Dark Tower” () As the Man in Black, Matthew McConaughey is supposed to send chills down your spine, but he’s nothing but a preening, one-dimensional goof. That’s just one of the many unfortunate elements in this Stephen King adaptation plagued by washed-out cinematography, mediocre special effects and stilted dialogue. 94 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Despicable Me 3” () As a couple of hours of kidtertainment, you could do worse, but it’s nothing to write home about. Trey Parker’s ‘80s-inspired super-villain is probably the most entertaining part of the film, aside from perhaps the Fredonian cheese festival. It’s wacky but somehow dull. 90 minutes (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Detroit” () Arriving almost exactly 50 years since the Detroit riots of 1967, Kathryn Bigelow’s “Detroit” is a searing, shocking and deeply effective dramatic interpretation of events in and around the Algiers Motel, where police tortured, abused and assaulted a dozen “suspects,” murdering three of them. 143 minutes. (R)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Dunkirk” () Many will respond to the film as a grueling dramatization of what the English call “the Dunkirk spirit,” that turned a perilous mass evacuation of British and Allied troops, under German fire, into a show of collective resilience at a crucial early crossroads of World War II. This film also screens in IMAX. 106 minutes. (PG-13)

— Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune

“The Emoji Movie” () This movie is exactly what you expect: There’s no need to wait and see if it surprises, if maybe it’s potentially great. Nope, it’s a perfect reflection of its main character — meh. Malfunctioning “meh” emoji Gene (T.J. Miller) goes on an odyssey from app to app, hoping to reprogram himself to only express one emotion. This story just feels so unimaginative and low-stakes. This film also screens in 3-D. 86 minutes. (PG)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Food Evolution” (star rating unavailable) Calm, careful, potentially revolutionary, “Food Evolution” is the unusual issue film that deals in counterintuitive reason rather than barely controlled hysteria as it wades into the GMO (genetically modified organisms) controversy. This documentary may not change your mind, but it will make you consider what caused you to decide in the first place. 92 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times

“A Ghost Story” () A love story about the world beyond our plane intersecting with the mundane and the mortal, where the ghost in question is not a Patrick Swayze hunk but Casey Affleck in a sheet with eye holes. As a droll, quiet sketch of a life interrupted and then continued from outside our earthly periphery, “A Ghost Story” is intriguing and fascinating. 92 minutes. (R)

— Cary Darling, Fort Worth Star-Telegram

“Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” () A sci-fi action movie that spoofs the form to strong comic effect, and yet it profits from every good thing about the genre it’s mocking. “Vol. 2” is wilder and more inspired than the first “Guardians.” It throws a lot into the pot, but it keeps all the elements clear and finds ways to have fun at every turn. 136 minutes. (PG-13)

— Mick LaSalle, The San Francisco Chronicle

“An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power” () The sequel to 2006’s Oscar-winning “An Inconvenient Truth” follows Al Gore around the globe, as he meets with young (and practically worshipful) recruits to the climate change cause. The final scenes, urging viewers to sign up and get involved, make it seem as if we’ve been watching an infomercial all this time. 100 minutes. (PG)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Kidnap” () Halle Berry is on screen almost every second as a mom giving minivan chase to the captors who just snatched her 6-year-old son. It’s decent escapist action, but repeats itself to the point of becoming ridiculous. 81 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Landline” () In the ‘90s world of pay phones and “Must-See TV,” a 20-something woman (Jenny Slate) interacts with her parents (John Turturro and Edie Falco) and rebellious teenage sister (Abby Quinn). This is a very funny film about people dealing with very serious situations. 96 minutes. (R)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times

“Lost in Paris” ()Canadian Fiona (Fiona Gordon), goes to Paris to come to the aid of her elderly Aunt Martha (Emmanuelle Riva) and has trouble from the first minute she arrives. In between moments of overplayed comedy, “Lost in Paris” makes a few lunges in the direction of sentimentality, but there’s no real feeling to be had. 83 minutes. (No MPAA rating)

— Mick LaSalle, The San Francisco Chronicle

“Maudie” () Treated as an outcast, a fisherman’s housekeeper (Sally Hawkins) in Nova Scotia becomes something of a celebrity for her paintings. This is one of the most beautiful, uplifting movies of the year, capable of moving us to tears of appreciation for getting to know the title subject. 117 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Time

“Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales” () This is a cookie-cutter “Pirates” movie that faithfully follows the formula. “Dead Men Tell No Tales” suggests that there still may be oceans of “Pirates of The Caribbean” story to discover — perhaps a prequel — but there are no new treasures to be found in this installment. 129 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Spider-Man: Homecoming” () Tom Holland once again slips into the red and blue suit to lead his own Spidey film. Exotic and powerful alien detritus has been scooped up by a working class contractor, Toomes (Michael Keaton), who has been developing black market weapons with it and proves to be a formidable local foe for Spidey. “Homecoming” delivers eye-popping spectacle in spades, but it’s the characters that make it count. 133 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Transformers: The Last Knight” () While director Michael Bay whips up an impressively frenzied, machinated opera, the humans are another story — they’re not even an afterthought. The plot is a series of increasingly baffling events and watching it feels like hanging on to a bucking bronco for dear life. 146 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets” () Chronicling the wild adventures of two sassy space cops, Luc Besson has created an intoxicating, visually enchanting world in “Valerian.” Despite Valerian and Laureline’s hollow romantic relationship, and moments where the film loses the story thread and sense of geography altogether, it’s almost impossible to not be swept away by Besson’s stunning world, and his beating heart that drives the moral of the story home.. 137 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“War for the Planet of the Apes” () This blockbuster franchise has prioritized story, character and emotion without ever sacrificing spectacle. The plot hinges around spy missions, escape plans, secret tunnels, mind games and lucky breaks. Each death and every betrayal is deeply felt, and the film becomes a rumination on the psychological effects that war has on a soul after a prolonged experience. 140 minutes. (PG-13)

— Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service

“Wonder Woman” () Director Patty Jenkins’ origin story is packed with heart and empathy, and we have the endearing lead performance of Gal Gadot to thank for that. It’s a fully realized, three-dimensional characterization of a superhero that has never gotten her due — until now. 141 minutes. (PG-13)

— Richard Roeper, The Chicago Sun-Times